Beatrix, the genius

Gallery
1

A postcard depicting an illustration from “The Tale of Peter Rabbit” and a quote from the same book

Until the summer of this year, I knew Beatrix Potter only as a children’s book author: when I was young, my mother read me nearly all the “tale” books, from “The Tale of Peter Rabbit” to “The Tale of Mrs. Tittlemouse” – I loved every last one. That’s why last August, at the age of 29, when I discovered that close to our hotel in Scotland there was a small museum dedicated to Beatrix Potter, I led my family to the tiny village that hosted it and, as it turned out, hosted the very Beatrix during many summers.

There, suddenly and unexpectedly, I was faced with the evidence: newspaper articles, documents, collections, photos, and most surprisingly watercolours. Watercolours of the most beautiful accuracy, depicting mushrooms, mammals (rabbits, of course, hedgehogs, foxes and mice), insects, trees, flowers. The collections were of pressed leaves and dried mushrooms, the mostly posthumous articles were of Beatrix’s importance as a Naturalist.

2

Amanita crocta (left) and Amanita muscaria (right), watercolours by Beatrix Potter

3

A study on caterpillars that Beatrix composed when she was 8 years old

4

A part of Beatrix’s natural collection

5

A baby hedgehog – one of the many pets Beatrix had and drewI was amazed – a fellow Naturalist, right under my very eyes, and I had never noticed? But then I was pleased: of course, that must have been why I had loved her and still admired her work. We were of similar minds and fancies.

I was amazed – a fellow Naturalist, right under my very eyes, and I had never noticed? But then I was pleased: of course, that must have been why I had loved her and still admired her work. We were of similar minds and fancies.

So I bought her biography (one of the many available in the bookshop) called “Beatrix Potter, the extraordinary life of a Victorian genius” by Linda Lear and read it like I’ve never read a biography before.

6

A watercolour of Beatrix’s real pet, Peter Rabbit, lying on a rug in front of a fire in August 1899

Yes, Beatrix Potter was a very successful author of children’s illustrated books, the designer of the “small book” format and a believer in natural accuracy of all her stories and characters. She loved telling tales and making children smile and forget their worries (be they boredom or illness) – her first book, starring the famous Peter Rabbit, was first written as a letter to Noel Moore, the son of a friend, who was, at the time, bedridden. Her books still sell now (still in the original small format!) and children all over the world – they’ve been translated in 35 languages – love her and the animals characters she created.

7

The very shy Charles McIntosh, the postman-naturalist who befriended Beatrix

However, Beatrix’s interests lay mostly in nature and, especially, fungi. As a young woman she had spent many summers in Dalguise and there had met Charlie McIntosh, a postman with a passion for all that was nature. They formed a strong bond based on their common interest: fungi. She had a microscope and a talent for drawing and observing, whilst he had the knack of knowing where and when to find specimens – and especially he was in the field in the rainy autumn and winter seasons when most fungi sprung up of the damp earth. He would collect and send specimens of strange, rare or interesting fungi and she, in her house in London, would analyse and draw them twice in all their detail for future reference: she would send one copy to Mackintosh and keep the other. Her extremely detailed and scientifically correct drawings are still used now for the identification of many fungi.

8

Peter Rabbit and Mr. MacGregor, who most certainly was modelled after Charles McIntosh

During a particularly long winter, Beatrix managed to germinate spores of a particular fungi – a feat that had been done before only by one or two scientists, in labs, in Germany – and also hatched a new and controversial theory of lichens: that they consisted of a symbiosis between an algae and a moss. We now know this to be true, but in the 1800s only she and a handful of other Naturalists around the world were starting to realise it. Unfortunately, as with Mary Anning and her palaeontological discoveries, Beatrix tried, for years, to interest the Royal Society of London and the Linnean Society of London (the premium society in those days for the promotion of natural history) in her theories but to no avail. She was left saddened, disillusioned and frustrated, possibly in a depressive state by pompous and condescending men at the vertices of the Society.

9

Strobilomyces strobilaceus, 1893. Beatrix drew a map on the reverse to indicate to McIntosh where she found and painted the rare fungus

10

Watercolour of an edible mushroom, also by Beatrix

An ageing spinster, in need of money but most of all independence from her parents, in 1900 Beatrix started promoting herself as a children’s book author and trying to sell “The Tale of Peter Rabbit” to printing companies. Even here her initial bout of activity was not successful and in 1901 had to print her own copies for friends and family to prove she was, in reality, a goldmine. In october 1902 her first book was finally published by Frederick Warne & Co. After this first “little rabbit book”, as she called it, Beatrix wrote and published more than 20 books, all featuring anthropomorphised animals as the main characters of mini-adventures in the British countryside.

11

Some of Beatrix’s “little books”

12

Illustration for “The Tale of Peter Rabbit”

13

Mrs Tiggy-winkle, an illustration from “The Tale of Mrs. Tiggy-winkle”

Soon after, Beatrix’s Naturalistic streak emerged again. She started nurturing her ongoing interest in the lake district, originally fuelled by friends and acquaintances that were trying to save this typical English landscape and its inhabitant’s traditions and customs from the upcoming invasion of modern machines and infrastructures. Passionate about livestock, her interest settled mostly in the local Herdwick Sheep breed.

14

Beatrix Potter with a prize-winning Herdwick ewe

15

Study of a sheep’s head

No longer a spinster, she impulsively bought a farm, called Hill Top Farm, in Near Sawrey (Lancashire) in 1905 and thus started her campaign to protect the area. With her husband’s complete support, throughout the following years she steadily increased her lands and livestock count, and National Trust (for Places of Historic Interest or National Beauty, she was already thought of as an expert in the area and sought out for consultations and opinions. 

16

Beatrix with one of her favourite border collies, photographed on Hill Top Farm

17

An aged Beatrix outside the door of her cherished farm

Never an idle woman, Beatrix Potter worked and managed her lands and animals through thick and thin, with few exceptions until the day of her death in 1943. Most of her land was given to the trust in her will.

18

Statues of Peter Rabbit and his family

***************

1

Una cartolina con una illustrazione del libro “The tale of Peter Rabbit” ed una citazione dallo stesso

Fino all’estate di quest’anno, conoscevo Beatrix Potter solamente come l’autrice di libri per bambini: quando ero piccola, mia mamma mi ha comprato e letto molti dei “piccoli libri” di fiabe che scrisse, (da “The Tale of Peter Rabbit” a “The Tale of Mrs. Tittlemouse”) ed io ero innamorata di ognuno. Ecco perché nell’Agosto scorso, all’età di 29 anni, quando ho scoperto che vicino al nostro albergo in Scozia c’era un piccolo museo dedicato a Beatrix Potter, ho guidato la mia intera famiglia al piccolissimo villaggio che lo ospitava e che, abbiamo scoperto, aveva ospitato la stessa Beatrix per molte estati.

Lí, improvvisamente ed inaspettatamente, mi sono trovata faccia a faccia con l’evidenza: articoli di giornale, documenti, collezioni, foto, e sorprendentemente disegni ad acquarello. Acquarelli splendidamente dettagliati, di funghi, mammiferi (conigli, ovviamente, ricci, volpi e topi di campagna), insetti, alberi, fiori. Le collezioni erano di fiori, funghi essiccati e gli articoli di giornale, la maggior parte postumi, descrivevano l’importanza di Beatrix come Naturalista.

2

Amanita crocta (sinistra) e Amanita muscaria (destra), acquerelli di Beatrix Potter

3

Uno studio sui bruchi che fece Beatrix a 8 anni

4

Una parte della collezione naturalistica di Beatrix

5

Un giovane riccio – uno dei tanti che ebbe e disegnò Beatrix

Ero sbalordita – una Naturalista come me, sotto i miei occhi, e non me n’ero mai accorta? Ma poi ero felice: certo, ecco perché i suoi libri mi erano sempre piaciuti. Eravamo due persone con interessi e gusti simili.

6

Un acquerello del vero Peter Rabbit, coniglio domestico di Beatrix, sdraiato su di un tappettino davanti al fuoco nell’Agosto del 1899

Per cui, nel negozio del museo ben fornito di suoi libri e biografie, ho comprato “Beatrix Potter, the Extraordinary Life of a Victorian Genius” di Linda Lear e l’ho letto come non ho mai letto una biografia in vita mia.

Si, Beatrix Potter era una autrice di libri per bambini illustrati, l’ideatrice del formato “piccolo libro” (o “small book”, come lo chiamava lei) e la promotrice dell’estattezza scientifica di tutte le sue fiabe e personaggi. Adorava raccontare storie e far sorridere i bambini, in particolare quelli con più ragioni per essere tristi o preoccupati. Il suo primo libro, che ha come protagonista il famoso Peter Rabbit, fu inventato e mandato come una letterina illustrata a Noel Moore, il foglio di una amica, che era al tempo e letto malato. I suoi libri sono ancora venduti (sempre nel formato originale!) e bambini in tutto il mondo – sono stati tradotti in 35 lingue – ancora vengono presi da questi semplici racconti e personaggi vicini alla natura di tutti I giorni.

7

Il timidissimo Charles McIntosh, postino-naturalista che divenne amico di Beatrix

Tuttavia, gli interessi di Beatrix risiedevano prevalentemente nella natura e, in maniera particolare, nei funghi. Da giovane aveva passato molte estati in Dalguise e lí aveva conosciuto Charlie McIntosh, un postino con una forte passione per la natura. Formarono un forte legame basato sul loro interesse comune: i funghi. Lei aveva un microscopio e un talento per il disegno e l’osservazione, mentre lui aveva l’abilità di sapere dove e quando sarebbero nati nuovi funghi – e specialmente era sul campo in Autunno e Inverno quando la maggior parte dei funghi spuntavano dalla terra umida. Li raccoglieva e poi mandava a Beatrix i campioni più strani, rari o semplicemente interessanti e lei, nella sua casa a Londra, li analizzava e disegnava in maniera dettagliata in doppia copia – una per lei e una per lui. I suoi disegni dettagliatissimi e scientificamente corretti sono usati ancora ora per l’identificazione di molti funghi.

8

Peter Rabbit ed il Sig. MacGregor, molto probabilmente ispirato da Charles McIntosh

9

Strobilomyces strobilaceus, 1893. Beatrix disegnò una mappa sul retro per indicare a McIntosh dove aveva trovato e disegnato questo fungo raro.

10

Acquarello di un fungo commestibile

Durante un inverno particolarmente lungo, Beatrix riuscì a far germinare le spore di un particolare fungo – impresa che era stata effettuata solamente da uno o due scienziati, in laboratorio, in Germania – e concepì una nuova e controversa teoria sui licheni: che erano una simbiosi tra un alga e un fungo. Ora sappiamo che questo è vero, ma all’inizio del 1800 solo lei ed un’altra manciata di Naturalisti nel mondo avevano iniziato a rendersene conto. Sfortunatamente, come nel caso di Mary Anning, Beatrix provò per decine di anni ad interessare la Royal Society of London e la Linnean Society of London (la società di promozione di storia naturale più esclusiva al tempo) nelle sue teorie ma senza esito. Ne rimase rattristita, delusa e frustrata, possibilmente in uno stato depressivo dagli uomini pomposi ed altezzosi che erano ai vertici di queste società.

11

Alcuni “piccoli libri” di Beatrix

12

Illustrazione per “The Tale of Peter Rabbit”

13

Mrs. Tiggy-winkle, illustrazione dal libro “The Tale of Mrs. Tiggy-winkle”

Una zitella stagionata, con la necessità di indipendenza finanziaria ed emotiva dai suoi genitori, nel 1900 Beatrix iniziò a promuoversi come autrice di libri per bambini e cercare di vendere “The Tale of Peter Rabbit” alle compagnie di stampa. Anche qui il suo sforzo iniziale fu una delusione, e nel 1901 dovette stampare privatamente copie da dare ai suoi amici e famigliari per dimostrare che era, in realtà una vera fonte di guadagno. Nell’Ottobre del 1902 il suo primo libro fu finalmente stampato da Fredrick Warne & Co. Dopo questo primo “little rabbit book”, come lo chiamava lei, Beatrix scrisse e pubblicò con successo più di 20 libri, tutti con animali antropomorfizzati come protagonisti di min-avventure nella campagna del Regno Unito.

Poco dopo, lo spirito naturalista di Beatrix si ripresentò. Iniziò a nutrire un interesse verso il Lake District, nel Nord dell’Inghilterra, originariamente stimolato da amici e conoscenti che stavano cercando di salvare questo paesaggio tipico Inglese e le sue tradizioni e culture dall’arrivo imminente dell’era moderna, con le sue infrastrutture e nuovi macchinari. Con una passione per il bestiame, Beatrix si interessò ben presto alla varietà locale di pecora denominata Herdwick.

14

Beatrix Potter ed una pecora della razza Herdwick appena premiata

15

Studio della testa di una pecora

Non più una zitella, comprò su impulso una fattoria chiamata Hill Top Farm, in Near Sawrey (Lancashire) nel 1905 e così iniziò la sua personale campagna per proteggere l’area. Con il sostegno completo di suo marito, negli anni successivi procedette a comprare terre e bestiame. Quando il National Trust (for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty) iniziò ad interessarsi alla zona, lei era considerata uno dei maggiori esperti e venne consultata per svariate problematiche e questioni rilevanti.

16

Beatrix con uno dei suoi Border Collie preferiti, fotografata a Hill Top Farm

17

Una anziana Beatrix, sulla soglia della sua amata tenuta

Mai una donna inattiva, Beatrix Potter lavorò ed amministrò le sue terre ed animali attraverso qualsiasi difficoltà, con poche eccezioni, fino alla sua morte nel 1943. Lasciò tutte le sue terre al National Trust nel suo testamento.

18

Statue di Peter Rabbit e la sua famiglia

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s