Bates, Henry Walter

Gallery
Bates in London, ca. 1880 Maull & Fox photographers, London

Bates in London, ca. 1880
Maull & Fox photographers, London

Henry Walter Bates was born in Leicester to a middle-class family and by the age of 14 he was working in the family factory for close to eleven hours a day. However, set on improving himself, he would then find the energy to attend night classes at a local school. In a few years he had worked himself into exhaustion: so much so that his family physician was the one who backed Bates up and told the family that to improve his health, an expedition to South America might actually help. Whilst in the Amazon, he would head out into the forest each morning “dressed in boots, trousers, an old hat and a coloured shirt with a pin cushion on the front for keeping six different sizes of insect pins at the ready. He carried a long shotgun over his left shoulder” with two different shots in it, ready for two different sizes of quarry. “In his right hand, he carried his butterfly net. A leather bag at his left side held ammunition and a box for insect specimens. A game bag on his right held further supplies, with leather thongs for hanging lizards, snakes, frogs, large birds and other specimens.” He was in the Amazon for a little more than a decade during an expedition that was organised and spent in part with Alfred Wallace, whom he had met in Leicester and with whom he shared an Entomological passion. 

Bates, at left, holding a club watching Amazonian native Indians capturing terrapins and a cayman.  Wood engraving from Bates 'The Naturalist on the River Amazons,' 1863.

Bates, at left, holding a club watching Amazonian native Indians capturing terrapins and a cayman.
Wood engraving from Bates ‘The Naturalist on the River Amazons,’ 1863.

Bates spent what he considered the “best eleven years of my life” in the Amazon, from 1848 to 1859. During these years he was robbed and left barefoot (“a great inconvenience in tropical forests”, he said); saved part of his collection from a shipwreck and in doing so upped his chances of dying; and nursed a toucan to health to then keep him (named “Tocano”) as a pet. He was hypnotised by leafcutter ants and their ability to apparently incessant work, going to and fro to their next with pieces of leaves (that he thought helped protect the nest against the rain), and quickly learnt that leaves weren’t the only things they carried: on returning to his camp one day he found a long line of them steadily emptying his supply of cassava meal. Helped by his assistants, he readily started stomping on them with his shoes – when that wouldn’t work, he discovered that blowing them up with carefully planted lines of gunpowder seemed to dissuade them efficiently.

He was a curious, patient and tolerant man who fit in so well with the local population and dangers – apart from crocodiles, the only thing that scared him were poisonous snakes – that he returned after a full 11 years only because of intellectual loneliness – Tocano obviously had not been trained well enough to serve as a real companion. He had concluded that “the contemplation of Nature alone is not sufficient to fill the human heart and mind”.

Apart from a large amount of stories that he would later gather in a book (“The Naturalist on the River Amazons”) he shipped back to England, on three separate vessels, 8000 new species of animals and plants previously unknown to scientists. Most of them were insects, his passion, and it was for the relationship between two insects – and the theory that stemmed from it – that Bates is most often remembered. 

After having had shot a toucan (Ramphastos), Bates left the bird to recover his game bag. It was only wounded, however, and on his attempt to seize it, it set up a loud scream. In an instant, trees seemed alive with these birds, that descended towards him, all croaking and fluttering their wings. After killing the wounded one they remounted the trees, and before he could reload every one of them had disappeared. From H.W. Bates. 1863. The Naturalist on the River Amazons.

After having had shot a toucan (Ramphastos), Bates left the bird to recover his game bag. It was only wounded, however, and on his attempt to seize it, it set up a loud scream. In an instant, trees seemed alive with these birds, that descended towards him, all croaking and fluttering their wings. After killing the wounded one they remounted the trees, and before he could reload every one of them had disappeared.
From H.W. Bates. 1863. The Naturalist on the River Amazons.

On catching a butterfly one day Bates was surprised to find that what he thought he had caught was, in fact, another species. Similar in flight, similar in wing pattern but different in several important characteristics. So important, in fact, that the Naturalist proceeded to analyse the species and decide that it was definitely not a subspecies of the one it so closely resembled. The “original” butterfly was a member of the Heliconidae family, with a typical wing colour, slow, fluttering flight and distinctive odour – an odour that was indicative of a unpalatability that bordered on poisonous. Bates concluded that the wing pattern was a way of “warning” potential predators that these butterflies were not as yummy as others: “I never saw flocks of slow-flying Heliconidae in the woods persecuted by birds or Dragonflies” he wrote. He then thought that maybe the other species, of the Pieridae family, were disguised in the same “dress”, imitating the harmful Heliconidae and in this way sharing their immunity. Like a pigeon, he tried to explain, “with the general figure and plumage of a Hawk”. He called this phenomena “the most beautiful in Nature” and later it would be taught in all Universities under the name of Batesian Mimicry.

While working on this theory, he also had the chance of finding a caterpillar doing a magnificent imitation of a small and poisonous snake. He took the inoffensive caterpillar back to the village he was camping in and derived great satisfaction in scaring all the children…and adults. 

Nipam H. Patel, Evolution, 2007, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press

Nipam H. Patel, Evolution, 2007, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press

An illustration from Bates' original paper (Transactions of the Linnean Society vol. 23, 1862) in which he proposed his theory of mimicry. Shown here is a detail from plate 56 (Bates, 1862) showing the classic example of mimicry discussed by Bates: Dismorphia (Pieridae) ontop and Mechanitis (Nymphalidae) below.

An illustration from Bates’ original paper (Transactions of the Linnean Society vol. 23, 1862) in which he proposed his theory of mimicry. Shown here is a detail from plate 56 (Bates, 1862) showing the classic example of mimicry discussed by Bates: Dismorphia (Pieridae) ontop and Mechanitis (Nymphalidae) below.

A caterpillar of the Deilephila elpenor species that is using Batesian Mimicry to imitate a tree snake.  Author unknown, original file name: bs-nat-Hawkmoth_Caterpillar-hab-ngs.jpg

A caterpillar of the Deilephila elpenor species that is using Batesian Mimicry to imitate a tree snake.
Author unknown, original file name: bs-nat-Hawkmoth_Caterpillar-hab-ngs.jpg

On his return to England in 1859 he was snubbed by most intellectuals of the time, who considered him a simple “species man” and it took him years to finally be elected, in 1864, as Assistant Secretary of the Royal Geographical Society of London and later, in 1868, as President of the Entomological Society of London.

 When he died of bronchitis in 1892 (aged 67), his friend Alfred Wallace was particularly bitter in his obituary, citing the “confinement and constant strain” of office work at the Geographical Society of London as the main cause of his weakened constitution, that had probably “shortened a valuable life”. 

*************************

Bates a Londra, ca. 1880 Maull & Fox photographers, London

Bates a Londra, ca. 1880
Maull & Fox photographers, London

Henry Walter Bates nacque in una famiglia di ceto medio a Leicester. All’eta’ di 14 anni era gia’ impiegato nella fabbrica di famiglia con una giornata lavorativa che solitamente durava undici ore. Tuttavia Bates, nell’intento di migliorarsi, trovava l’energia di frequentare una scuola serale e, dopo vari anni, aveva abusato troppo di se stesso, tanto da subire dei collassi di salute cosi importanti che fu il dottore di famiglia a sostenere la scelta di una spedizione in Sud America, che forse avrebbe migliorato la sua precaria salute. Mentre era nella foresta Amazzonica, era solito uscire la mattina “vestito di stivali, pantaloni, un vecchio cappello e una camicia colorata con un puntaspilli sul davanti con infilzati sei diverse misure di spilli per insetti. Portava un lungo fucile sulla spalla sinistra” carica con due diversi colpi per due diverse misure di preda. “Nella sua mano destra aveva la sua rete per farfalle. Una borsa di pelle sulla sinistra aveva munizioni ed una scatola per gli insetti. Un carniere sulla destra aveva altre provviste, incluse delle pinze di pelle per appendere lucertole, serpenti, rane, grossi uccelli ed altri esemplari.” Rimase nella foresta Amazzonica per poco piu’ di un decennio durante una spedizione organizzata e trascorsa in parte con Alfred Wallace, collega Entomologo incontrato a Leicester. 

Bates, sulla sinistra, con in mano una clava mentre guarda indigeni delle Amazzoni che catturano tartarughe ed un caimano.  Incisione su legno da Bates “Un Naturalista sul Rio delle Amazzoni”, 1863

Bates, sulla sinistra, con in mano una clava mentre guarda indigeni delle Amazzoni che catturano tartarughe ed un caimano.
Incisione su legno da Bates “Un Naturalista sul Rio delle Amazzoni”, 1863

Bates passo’ quello che considero’ “i migliori undici anni della mia vita” nella foresta Amazzonica, dal 1848 al 1859. Durante questi anni fu derubato e lasciato scalzo (“una grande seccatura nelle foreste tropicali”, disse); salvo’ parte della sua collezione durante un naufragio mettendo in pericolo la sua stessa vita; e curo’ un tucano che poi tenne (e chiamo’ “Tocano”) come animale da compagnia. Fu ipnotizzato dalle formiche tagliafoglie e la loro capacita’ di apparente incessante trasporto di foglie tagliate per e da il nido (che lui pensava servissero per proteggerlo dalla pioggia), e rapidamente imparo’ che le foglie non erano l’unica cosa che potevano trasportare: tornando all’accampamento un giorno scopri’ una lunga fila di formiche che stavano risolutamente svuotando la sua scorta di farina di manioca. Aiutato dai suoi assistenti, prontamente inizio’ a calpestarle con le sue scarpe – quando vide che questa tattica non funzionava, scopri che farle esplodere con una striscia di polvere da sparo collocata con attenzione serviva a dissuaderle efficacemente. Era una persona curiosa, paziente e tollerante che si inseri’ cosi’ bene nella vita Amazzonica – coccodrilli e serpenti velenosi a parte – che decise di ritornare dopo 11 lunghi anni unicamente per la solitudine intellettuale: Tocano evidentemente non era riuscito ad onorare il suo ruolo di compagno. Concluse infatti che “la sola contemplazione della Natura non e’ sufficiente a riempire il cuore e la mente umana.”

Oltre ad un enorme quantita’ di racconti e storie che successivamente furono riunite in un libro (“Il Naturalista sul Rio delle Amazzoni”) spedi’ in Inghilterra, in tre navi diverse, 8000 nuove specie di animali e piante nuovi al mondo scientifico. La maggior parte era composta da insetti, la sua passione, ed e’ per la relazione tra due insetti – e la teoria che ne derivo’, che Bates e’ viene ricordato piu’ spesso. 

Dopo aver sparato ad un tucano (Ramphastos) Bates si allontano' per recuperare la sua borsa. Tornando, scopri' che il tucano in realta' era solo ferito e per dimostrarlo inizio' a strepitare: in un istante gli alberi sembrarono animarsi, improvvisamente pieni di altri tucani sul piede di guerra. Bates, impaurito, agi' d'istinto e uccise (questa volta sicuramente) il tucano ferito. Il cessare degli urli basto' per far disperdere gli altri tucani ancor prima che il Naturalista riuscisse a ricaricare il fucile e Bates raccolse un'altra storia da raccontare.  Da Bates “Un Naturalista sul Rio delle Amazzoni”, 1863

Dopo aver sparato ad un tucano (Ramphastos) Bates si allontano’ per recuperare la sua borsa. Tornando, scopri’ che il tucano in realta’ era solo ferito e per dimostrarlo inizio’ a strepitare: in un istante gli alberi sembrarono animarsi, improvvisamente pieni di altri tucani sul piede di guerra. Bates, impaurito, agi’ d’istinto e uccise (questa volta sicuramente) il tucano ferito. Il cessare degli urli basto’ per far disperdere gli altri tucani ancor prima che il Naturalista riuscisse a ricaricare il fucile e Bates raccolse un’altra storia da raccontare.
Da Bates “Un Naturalista sul Rio delle Amazzoni”, 1863

Un giorno, acchiappando una farfalla, Bates noto’ con sorpresa che la farfalla presa non era la farfalla che aveva identificato in volo. Con volo e colori delle ali analoghi, la specie catturata aveva alcune importanti caratteristiche distintive. Cosi’ distintive, infatti, che il Naturalista procedette ad analizzare l’esemplare e decidere che non era decisamente ne’ la stessa specie ne’ tantomeno una sottospecie dei quella a cui assomigliava. La farfalla “originale” apparteneva alla famiglia Heliconidae, con una disegno alare tipico, un volo lento e svolazzante e un odore distintivo – indicativo di un sapore sgradevole al limite del velenoso. Bates concluse che il disegno alare era un “avvertimento” di sgradevolezza di sapore per potenziali predatori: “non ho mai visto stormi di Heliconidae dal volo lento inseguiti da uccelli o Libellule”, scrisse. Poi penso’ che forse l’altra specie, della famiglia Pieridae, si travestivano con lo stesso “vestito”, imitando l’indesiderato Heliconidae ed in questa maniera condividendo la sua immunita’. Come un piccione, cerco’ di spiegare, “con la forma generale e il piumaggio di un Falco”. Chiamo’ questo fenomeno “il piu’ bello in Natura” ed in futuro sarebbe stato spiegato in tutte le Universita’ sotto il nome di Mimetismo Batesiano.

Mentre stava studiando questa teoria, ebbe la fortuna di trovare un bruco nell’atto di una incredibile imitazione di un piccolo serpente velenoso. Prese il bruco inoffensivo e lo porto’ al villaggio in cui era accampato e ricavo’ una grande soddisfazione nel terrorizzare tutti i bambini….e gli adulti!

foto di Nipam H. Patel dal libro Evolution, 2007, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press

foto di Nipam H. Patel dal libro Evolution, 2007, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press

Una illustrazione dall'articolo orginiale di Bates (Transactions of the Linnean Society vol. 23, 1862) in cui propose la sua teoria del mimetismo. Qui, un dettaglio della figura 56 (Bates, 1862) che mostra il classico esempio di mimetismo discusso da Bates: Dismorphia (Pieridae) sopra e Mechanitis (Nymphalidae) sotto.

Una illustrazione dall’articolo orginiale di Bates (Transactions of the Linnean Society vol. 23, 1862) in cui propose la sua teoria del mimetismo. Qui, un dettaglio della figura 56 (Bates, 1862) che mostra il classico esempio di mimetismo discusso da Bates: Dismorphia (Pieridae) sopra e Mechanitis (Nymphalidae) sotto.

Un bruco della specie Deilephila elpenor che, usando il mimetismo Batesiano, imita un serpente arboreo. Autore sconosciuto, nome del file originale: bs-nat-Hawkmoth_Caterpillar-hab-ngs.jpg

Un bruco della specie Deilephila elpenor che, usando il mimetismo Batesiano, imita un serpente arboreo.
Autore sconosciuto, nome del file originale: bs-nat-Hawkmoth_Caterpillar-hab-ngs.jpg

Al suo ritorno in Inghilterra nel 1859 fu trattato con disprezzo dalla maggior parte degli intellettuali del tempo, che lo consideravano un semplice “raccogli-specie”, e ci vollero anni per essere finalmente eletto, nel 1864, a Sotto Segretario della Royal Geographical Society of London e piu’ tardi, nel 1868, a Presidente della Entomological Society of London.

Quando mori’ di bronchite nel 1892, all’eta’ di 67 anni, il suo amico Alfred Wallace fu particolarmente amaro nel necrologio, citando la “limitazione e costante tensione” del lavoro di ufficio svolto nella Geographical Society of London come causa principale del suo generale indebolimento fisico, che probabilmente aveva “accorciato una vita di valore.”

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s